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The Plight of the Staving Artist – the CLASSICS Act may provide some relief.

The plight of the “starving artist” is timeless and history is replete with stories of songwriters and artist being exploited for their intellectual contributions. In the mid 1800’s, when Stephen Foster wrote The Suwannee River, Oh! Susanna, Camptown Races, Jeanie with the Light Brown Hair, and Old Kentucky Home, the 1790 Copyright Act only [...]

By | 2017-08-02T17:53:08+00:00 August 2nd, 2017|Client Activity, Copyright Issues, Entertainment Industry News, Entertainment Law, Litigation, Music Industry, Music Publishing|Comments Off on The Plight of the Staving Artist – the CLASSICS Act may provide some relief.

Secret Blend of 11 Herbs: Three Things to Know about the 2016 Defend Trade Secrets Acts

By Drew Harris How delicious are those 11 “secret herbs and spices” assembled by Harland Sanders in 1930 for his popular “Kentucky Fried Chicken” sold at his local service station? It was so “finger lickin’ good” popular that the Governor Ruby Laffoon proclaimed him a “Colonel” and he started franchising his chicken business. But rather [...]

By | 2017-07-20T11:04:36+00:00 July 18th, 2017|Copyright Issues, Entertainment Industry News, Entertainment Law, Trademark Issues, Uncategorized|Comments Off on Secret Blend of 11 Herbs: Three Things to Know about the 2016 Defend Trade Secrets Acts

Sorting out the DOJ Ruling and its impact on performance rights

The first of the month (August 2016), the Department of Justice issued a summary of findings with regard to two court orders that govern the operation of two of the U.S. performing rights organizations (the “PRO’s”), ASCAP and BMI.  If it stands, the decision will also affect the third PRO, SESAC.Songwriters and music publishers around [...]

By | 2017-07-20T11:04:37+00:00 August 8th, 2016|Client Activity, Copyright Issues, Entertainment Industry News, Entertainment Law, Life on the Row, Music Industry, Music Law, Music Publishing, Music Row Nashville, Music Row News, Nashville, Songwriting|Comments Off on Sorting out the DOJ Ruling and its impact on performance rights

The Cat’s in the Cradle: The adventures of child sensation Maddie Ziegler

By Erin Thiele and Barry Neil Shrum, Esq. From the reality television show, Dance Moms to best-selling Sia album covers (including Chandelier, Elastic Heart, Big Girls Cry and Cheap Thrills), Capezio commercials, to featured judging on So You Think You Can Dance, 13-year old dancer Maddie Ziegler is the hottest teen sensation right now, and [...]

By | 2017-07-20T11:04:37+00:00 July 24th, 2016|Dance, Entertainment Industry News, Entertainment Law|Comments Off on The Cat’s in the Cradle: The adventures of child sensation Maddie Ziegler

Monkey See, Monkey Do?

by Erin Thiele and Morgan Wisted            NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE.  Casey Dienel is suing Justin Bieber and his producer, Sonny Moore, p/k/a Skrillex, (among other defendants) for copyright infringement involving her song, Ring the Bell, from which she claims the Bieb stole musical riffs for his hit Sorry.  She claims that the [...]

By | 2017-07-20T11:04:38+00:00 July 7th, 2016|Copyright Issues, Entertainment Law, Music Row Nashville|Comments Off on Monkey See, Monkey Do?

Lockean Theory of property and its impact on the Declaration of Independence, U.S. Constitution and modern day Copyright Law

“[E]very man has a property in his own person. This nobody has any right to but himself. The labour of his body, and the work of his hands, we may say, are properly his….”[1] John Locke - a political and social philosopher of 17th Century Enlightenment England and the father of “Classical Liberalism” - was [...]

By | 2017-07-20T11:04:40+00:00 May 13th, 2015|Copyright Issues, Creative, Entertainment Law, Music Law|Comments Off on Lockean Theory of property and its impact on the Declaration of Independence, U.S. Constitution and modern day Copyright Law

Gorilla Photographer: When is a photograph original?

Written by Amber Shultz* Edited by Barry Neil Shrum, Esq. A recent headline on the BBC News was “Jersey Gorilla Turns Photographer at Durrell Park.” The story was about a silverback gorilla at Durrell Wildlife Park in New Jersey named Ya Kwanza, who was given a high-definition camera in an indestructible box. While examining the [...]

By | 2017-07-20T17:44:00+00:00 July 2nd, 2013|Copyright Issues, Entertainment Law|Comments Off on Gorilla Photographer: When is a photograph original?

Leopardi’s Common Denominator appears in bright lights in the Big Apple

If you look closely at the bottom of photograph to left, you’ll see my client, Jay Leopardi, and his new show Common Denominator, featured in the bright lights in New York City.  None other than Times Square!  Congrats to Jay and president of IC Places, Inc., owners of PunchTV, who will fund and host the [...]

By | 2017-07-20T17:44:00+00:00 July 31st, 2012|Client Activity, Entertainment Industry News, Entertainment Law, Music Industry|Comments Off on Leopardi’s Common Denominator appears in bright lights in the Big Apple

Jay Leopardi to produce new television series, Common Denominator

My client and long term friend, Jay Leopardi continues to build a remarkable brand.  Not only is Jay working the THE Shark, Daymond John on several projects, but he just landed a tr emendous opportunity in the world of entertainment.  Jay has agreed to produce a series of interviews with various bu siness leaders to take his viewers on [...]

By | 2017-07-20T17:44:00+00:00 July 25th, 2012|Client Activity, Entertainment Industry News, Entertainment Law|Comments Off on Jay Leopardi to produce new television series, Common Denominator

Will the real Sarah Palin please standup?: Interplay between Right of Publicity and Trademark

OR, What's in a Name? Personal Names as Trade Names REMIXED. By Barry Neil Shrum, Esquire (with Ashley Trout) "That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet." You may know this quote from William Shakespeare’s classic play Romeo and Juliet or from the more "pop-culture" reference by Anne Hathaway [...]

By | 2017-07-20T17:44:04+00:00 April 29th, 2011|Entertainment Law, RIAA, Trademark Issues|Comments Off on Will the real Sarah Palin please standup?: Interplay between Right of Publicity and Trademark